Invesco Canada blog

Insights, commentary and investing expertise

The Rise of Robots


November 5, 2018
Subject | Industry views | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

How the fourth industrial revolution will transform economics, politics, and more

After two centuries of industrial transformation and change, we’ve reached what many now call the Fourth Industrial Revolution. It’s marked not by the introduction of steam power or the advent of mass production but by the rise of artificial intelligence and automation that will fundamentally transform the global division of labour.

Continued

Leave a comment

Five key takeaways from the IMF annual meeting


October 22, 2018
Subject | Invesco | Macro views

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) took a decidedly bearish tone during its annual meeting in Bali earlier this month – in fact, I would say it was the grimmest gathering of the IMF that I’ve ever seen. I had the opportunity to attend the talks in Indonesia, and I came home with five key takeaways. Below, I summarize those takeaways and share the viewpoint from Invesco’s Office of the Global Market Strategist.

Continued

Leave a comment

Europe: 5 Scenarios for Investors to Watch


October 3, 2018
Subject | Industry views | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

The future of the euro and that of the EU are inextricably tied according to our latest white paper, I co-authored with Jacek Rostowski, a former Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister of Poland. The big question for us is how could today’s political landscape impact the region in the coming months and years – and what does that mean for investors?

Continued

Leave a comment

What does the Italian “no” vote mean for the eurozone?

Italians voted Sunday, Dec. 4, to reject changes to their constitution, leading to the resignation of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and marking a victory for the country’s populist movement. Polls had suggested that Italian voters would reject the referendum on constitutional amendments to reform the Senate by a margin of about 10%. The turnout at 70% and margin of victory at 18% were both higher than expected.

Continued

Leave a comment