Invesco Canada blog

Insights, commentary and investing expertise

Six issues driving global markets


July 10, 2018
Subject | Institutional | Invesco

As I write this, early on July 9, global stocks have hit a two-week high1 and the price of copper is rallying. Markets are clearly focusing on positive data at the moment, which is a welcome change. Below, I highlight six important things that happened last week – both positive and negative – and several upcoming issues to watch.

Continued

Leave a comment

Federal Reserve hikes with upbeat outlook

The U.S. Federal Open Market committee (Fed) continued their recent gradual hiking cycle by increasing the federal funds rate by 0.25 percentage points at today’s meeting. The target range after the hike is now 1.75%-2.00%. The financial markets had been fully expecting today’s move.

Continued

Leave a comment

Is the ‘synchronized’ global expansion really in sync?


May 8, 2018
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

“Getting long in the tooth” is an interesting way to describe something that is getting old and presumably nearing its end – it refers to the long-time practice of estimating a horse’s age by looking at its mouth. I’ve found myself using this expression a lot these days, as the U.S. experiences its second-longest economic expansion in the last 100 years. But investors should remember that – even as market-watchers talk about “synchronized global growth” – other economies are in much earlier stages of expansion.

Continued

Leave a comment

Five things to watch in April


April 3, 2018
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

The first quarter of the year has ended with major developed market indices down slightly and major emerging market indices up slightly. But those numbers belie a very turbulent period in which stocks were whipsawed. Bonds also experienced gyrations, with the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury moving from 2.41% at the start of the quarter to a peak of 2.94% and ending at 2.74%.1 As we begin the second quarter, there are five critical things to watch.

Continued

Leave a comment

Investing in emerging markets: Multinationals vs. local


March 29, 2018
Subject | Active management | Institutional | Trimark

I am often asked why an investor should invest in local businesses in emerging markets instead of putting their money in large multinational companies. For example, why invest in Amorepacific Corp., a Korean cosmetics company, over Revlon, a multinational that derives a portion of its revenue from sales in emerging markets? This is a fair question, and as a long-term global investor, I will outline my thoughts on it in this blog post.

Continued

Leave a comment

Why truly active managers aren’t afraid of rising rates

With interest rates starting to rise, many investors are wondering what impact, if any, the move upward might have on their portfolios. We asked Marina Pomerantz, a portfolio manager on the Trimark Global Equities team and Neeraj Khosla, an investment analyst covering emerging-market (EM) equities for the same team, for their views on the current interest-rate environment.

Continued

Leave a comment

The Fed stays the course under its new leader

The Federal Reserve (Fed) raised interest rates by a quarter of a percentage point as expected on Wednesday and signaled two more rate hikes for 2018. It also released its Summary of Economic Projections (SEP) for the next few years, which suggests that the Fed is optimistic regarding the future performance of the U.S. economy.

Continued

Leave a comment

Four risks to watch in 2018

Our market outlook is positive, but institutional investors need to be ready for disruption

My base case for 2018 is that global growth will be solid and accelerating while global inflation will be low and benign. While I expect central banks around the world to tighten financial conditions, I believe the pace will be slow enough that overall financial conditions should remain accommodative. If my positive expectations for global growth, inflation and financial conditions come to pass, then the environment should be supportive of all risky assets in 2018, including credit and equity. However, we can’t ignore the potential risks to these conditions.

Continued

Leave a comment

Good news is bad news: Deconstructing the market sell-off


February 13, 2018
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

Stocks globally have experienced more than a week of tumultuous trading, with the U.S. stock market officially in correction territory. And after being relatively sedate for years, the VIX Index has risen dramatically in recent days, indicating rising volatility. Stocks have moved so far so fast that investors have experienced financial whiplash and are trying to understand what caused markets to change course so abruptly. To put it simply, almost everything that should be a positive for stocks is now a negative for stocks.

Continued

Leave a comment

Above-trend growth could cause U.S. inflation later in 2018

Employment growth has been strong enough that the Bank of Canada (BOC) hiked its overnight target rate to 1.25% in January.1 The BOC statement attempted to balance the view that growth was near capacity with concerns that raising rates too quickly could cause the economic expansion to stall. The 10-year yield has broken through its previous peak of 2.15% on the growth story and a modest pickup in inflation.2 We believe yields should continue to move higher from these levels.

Continued

Leave a comment

What does market volatility mean for fixed income?

Market expectations of inflation have risen in recent days, after signs of wage growth – often seen as a harbinger of inflation – appeared in the January jobs report. We at Invesco Fixed Income believe investor concerns that inflation is finally showing signs of life have helped drive interest rates higher and impacted credit markets, where worries over higher interest rates (and their potential impact on companies) have caused declines in stock markets and other risky assets.1

Continued

Leave a comment

Is the world shifting from connection to economic protection?


January 30, 2018
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

Last week offered some stark reminders that we live in a very global and interconnected world. Given how interwoven our international relationships have become, the current trend toward de-globalization carries with it many consequences — and protectionism could become the biggest economic risk of them all.

Continued

Leave a comment

Getting a read on the Goldilocks economy


January 9, 2018
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

Last week saw the release of the latest U.S. employment report, with just 148,000 nonfarm payrolls created in December.1 This was significantly below expectations and the previous month’s reading. However, it may have been a Goldilocks jobs report: It is good enough to stave off any concerns that the economy may be weakening, but it’s not strong enough to suggest that the economy is overheating.

Continued

Leave a comment

Ten expectations for 2018


January 3, 2018
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

Last year was a strong one for capital markets. Most countries’ stock markets posted positive returns, with many markets, including the U.S., posting double-digit gains. Globally, and in the U.S., the best-performing sector was technology. Energy was the worst-performing sector globally – and was one of the worst-performing sectors in the U.S.1

Continued

Who’ll be watching the punch bowl in 2018?


December 19, 2017
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views | Trimark

Last week saw a confluence of central bank meetings and decisions over the course of two days. They revealed central banks that are in the process of – or on the verge of – tightening. I was reminded of former Federal Reserve (Fed) Chair William McChesney Martin, who said the central task of his job was “to take away the punch bowl just when the party gets going.” But is the party really just getting going – or is it getting long in the tooth? And, most importantly, who is the chaperone? And how strict are they?

Continued

Leave a comment