Invesco Canada blog

Insights, commentary and investing expertise

Market review: Are emotions overriding facts?


July 26, 2017
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

Global stocks moved higher last week, driven by a U.S. stock market that continued to advance despite a plethora of negative headlines and a growing likelihood that U.S. President Donald Trump’s legislative agenda will not come to fruition in 2017. In addition, U.S. stock-market volatility, as measured by the VIX Index, remains very low. It’s almost as if U.S. stocks have a Teflon-like coating around them, shielding them from the brunt of negative news. But why?

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Market review: The global forces of disruption


July 18, 2017
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

One of the key themes I’ve identified for 2017 and beyond is global disruption. Disruption can take many forms and be either a positive or negative force. The economist Joseph Schumpeter argued that disruption could be a positive force for economies – hence the term, “creative destruction.” Disruption – both positive and negative, both geopolitical and monetary – is abundant across the globe right now.

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Up, up and away: BoC hikes rate

Following recent upbeat comments, the Bank of Canada (BoC) announced today that it would hike the overnight target rate to 0.75% from 0.50%. This is the first rate hike since 2010, as the BoC has become confident that the current “above potential growth” will continue, leading it to take back one of two emergency rate cuts enacted in 2015.

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Interest-rate outlook: Expect rising rates in Canada

In June, Canadian 10-year government bond yields bounced off their lowest levels of the year, to 1.63%, as first quarter growth came in above expectations and central banks express confidence that monetary policy has accomplished it’s goal.1 The Bank of Canada (BoC), in particular, is less worried about uncertain U.S. trade policy and another substantial drop in oil prices, and becoming worried that excess capacity is beginning to dwindle. Their optimism may prove to be premature as inflation remains very low, so we are watching its stance closely. We expect interest rates in Canada to rise from current levels.

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