Invesco Canada blog

Insights, commentary and investing expertise

Looking beyond the active-passive debate

Recently, one of Invesco’s funds – Trimark International Companies Fund – was singled out for praise as an example that true active management can outperform. While the kudos were well-deserved for the team, it appeared as part of a commentary that was otherwise unsympathetic to active management.

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Interest-rate outlook: Excess pessimism in U.K.

During the recent rate rally, the Canadian 10-year government bond yield held at 1.45% and has bounced slightly from there, but still remains at the lower end of its recent range.1 Economic data has tapered off from the strong rebound seen in the first quarter and the Bank of Canada continues to keep monetary policy on hold. The U.S.’s recently imposed tariffs on Canadian softwood exports raised concerns about broader trade implications. In addition, a Canadian subprime mortgage lender has experienced a liquidity drain, drawing attention to an area of the mortgage market that is not typically in the news. We would expect Canadian yields to remain supported in any sell-off.

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Currency outlook: Continued CAD volatility

The Canadian dollar weakened significantly in April, breaking out of its one-year range. A combination of factors contributed to the weakness. Higher U.S. oil production and lower oil prices have put pressure on the Canadian currency. The announcement of U.S. tariffs on Canadian softwood exports has also been a factor. Third, the recent liquidity problems of a Canadian subprime mortgage lender have played a role. Despite the recent strength in the latter half of May, we believe weakness in the Canadian dollar is likely to continue.

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Interest-rate outlook: Impact of upcoming British election

The yield on the 10-year Canadian government bond broke through its recent range of 1.60%-1.87%, reaching a low of 1.43% on April 18.1 Geopolitical risks, as well as concerns about elections in France were the big driver as the economic data in Canada has been fairly positive.

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Currency outlook: Global growth, eurozone elections continue

Canadian dollar strength has faded recently despite stronger economic data. Weakness in oil prices has been responsible for some of the reversal. The Bank of Canada has, at least temporarily, dropped its dovish tilt, but appears content to leave the overnight rate target at 0.50% for the foreseeable future.1 The Canadian dollar continues to remain overvalued, in our view.

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Currency management: A simple roadmap

Global diversification has become standard practice among investors around the world. As the trend toward global investing grows, managing currency risk in global portfolios is likely to take on increasing importance. Sovereign wealth funds, central banks and other investors are likely to consider the benefits and challenges of currency hedging as their investment strategies become more globally focused. However, evaluating the impact of foreign exchange risk on portfolios and how to address that risk is a debated issue. Should global investors adopt strategies to specifically address currency risk or should they not?

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Currency outlook: CDN overvalued, USD mixed

The Canadian dollar was reasonably strong until the first week of March, when the U.S. Federal Reserve (the “Fed”) began telegraphing the prospects of a rate hike at its March meeting. The Bank of Canada has appeared to continue to favour a somewhat weaker currency in spite of some strong economic data, including very strong full-time employment reports. Our opinion remains that the Canadian dollar is overvalued and we favour being short the currency.

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Interest-rate outlook as global growth improves

The 10-year Canadian government bond yield has retreated from its 2017 peak yield of 1.87% and currently sits in the middle of this year’s range of 1.61% – 1.87%.1 Economic data has generally been picking up this year with employment growth showing particular strength. The Bank of Canada has kept policy on hold recently, but remains wary of persistent economic slack. We believe the current trading range is likely to persist unless global economic growth picks up further.

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Why we are not afraid of the Fed

The Federal Reserve (Fed) raised interest rates in March and is likely to raise them again twice this year, yet the financial markets have taken this news in stride. Why is this? Simply put, the Fed is behaving dovishly, considering the positive growth pattern we are seeing.

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U.K. triggers Brexit with Article 50: What happens now?

The Brexit process started today, when British Prime Minister Theresa May formally notified the European Union (EU) of the U.K.’s intention to withdraw from the EU under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

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Third time’s a charm

The U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed) hiked its key interest rate by 0.25% today, to a range of 0.75%–1.00%, marking the third increase in the current cycle. Fixed income markets had essentially priced in the increase two weeks ago, when nearly every Fed speaker acknowledged that a March hike appeared to be warranted. The vote was not unanimous as Neel Kashkari, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, voted against the action, preferring to keep the target rate unchanged at this meeting.

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The future of ECB QE: Is the end in sight?

In recent months, consumer prices in the euro area have begun to align with the European Central Bank’s (ECB) inflation target of just under 2%.1 We expected January headline inflation to be around 1.8%, a far cry from the deflationary conditions that convinced the ECB to begin its asset purchase program (quantitative easing, or QE) in 2015 and then extend it in 2016. As we look forward to 2017 and beyond, we ask whether QE should extend beyond March 2018 or will the inflation hawks and external voices force the ECB to end it before the region is ready?

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Currency outlook: CAD overvalued and USD mixed

The Canadian dollar has appreciated against the U.S. dollar since the U.S. presidential election in November. Some of the strength has been due to the higher price of oil on the back of promised cuts by OPEC producers in late 2016. In addition, a recent string of positive employment reports in Canada has supported the currency. Bank of Canada Governor Poloz attempted to limit further appreciation by mentioning that a rate cut was still possible at its January meeting with limited success. We believe the Canadian dollar remains overvalued.

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Interest-rate outlook: Fed hikes on the horizon?

Yields on Canadian government bonds have hovered in a range this year as the global yield sell-off has paused. The yield curve remains in a steepening trend as the Bank of Canada has attempted to keep the possibility of a rate cut on the table, although a recent string of positive employment surprises has made that possibility less likely. Canadian government bond yields are likely to remain range-bound in the near term until more certainty emerges around global economic prospects.

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Currency outlook: USD volatility and euro weakness

The Canadian dollar has bounced around since the U.S. presidential election as economic growth has shown positive signs but inflation continues to disappoint the Bank of Canada (BoC). It sold off initially after the Fed raised rates in December, but rallied back strongly after year end. The BoC stated at its January meeting that rate cuts are still a possibility, but it will likely wait until more clarity is available on U.S. fiscal and trade policy before taking action. The Canadian dollar remains overvalued, in our view, but will likely trade within a range in the near term.

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Interest-rate outlook: The aftermath of Trump’s win

Canadian government yields have remained under the same upward pressure felt globally in the aftermath of the U.S. presidential election which boosted expectations of higher growth and inflation fueled by U.S. fiscal stimulus and tax cuts. The Bank of Canada meeting in January recognized that Canada’s economy has shown some improvement, but emphasized there was more work needed to reduce excess capacity as inflation remains very low.

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BoC holds rates amid Trump policy uncertainty

The Bank of Canada (BoC) announced today that the overnight policy rate remained unchanged at 0.5%. There wasn’t much suspense heading into today’s monetary policy meeting as economic data had shown at least some improvement recently and a rate cut did not appear warranted.

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The Fed finally hikes rates – what does it mean?

The U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed) hiked rates 0.25% today, for only the second time in this cycle, to a range of 0.5% – 0.75%. The statement that accompanied the meeting made note of a strengthening of the labour market, moderate growth and improving inflation. Additionally, the Fed views risks to the economy as “roughly balanced”.

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What does the Italian “no” vote mean for the eurozone?

Italians voted Sunday, Dec. 4, to reject changes to their constitution, leading to the resignation of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and marking a victory for the country’s populist movement. Polls had suggested that Italian voters would reject the referendum on constitutional amendments to reform the Senate by a margin of about 10%. The turnout at 70% and margin of victory at 18% were both higher than expected.

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