Invesco Canada blog

Insights, commentary and investing expertise

U.K. Parliament begins to reveal its Brexit preferences


March 29, 2019
Subject | Invesco | Macro views

The latest installment of the Brexit saga went into overtime again on the evening of March 27, as the House of Commons engaged in a first round of “indicative votes” on alternatives to U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s withdrawal deal. While the resolution remains uncertain, the contours of a way forward are finally starting to take shape based on voting preferences among the many alternatives put to an indicative vote.

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Brexit uncertainty could last for another 21 months


March 20, 2019
Subject | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

The latest installment of the Brexit drama offers good and bad news for investors in U.K. assets and beyond: The good news is the risk of a “no deal” Brexit has receded, but the bad news is it’s still a possibility and the timeline toward resolution is now more extended. This means that persistent uncertainty is likely to continue to weigh on the U.K. and wider European economies, and may elevate the volatility of U.K. asset markets, particularly the currency.

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What’s next for Brexit?


January 16, 2019
Subject | Invesco | Macro views

On Tuesday, Parliament rejected U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit Withdrawal Bill by a 230-vote margin – the largest defeat of legislation in nearly 250 years, when Parliamentary records began. That the defeat exceeded consensus by as much as 100 votes reflects the depth and breadth of dissatisfaction with May’s Brexit plan. Many Members of Parliament (MPs) fear it could further undermine the economy, contribute to secession in Northern Ireland or Scotland, or might not confer the freedom for which Brexiters campaigned in the referendum.

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The Rise of Robots


November 5, 2018
Subject | Industry views | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

How the fourth industrial revolution will transform economics, politics, and more

After two centuries of industrial transformation and change, we’ve reached what many now call the Fourth Industrial Revolution. It’s marked not by the introduction of steam power or the advent of mass production but by the rise of artificial intelligence and automation that will fundamentally transform the global division of labour.

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Five key takeaways from the IMF annual meeting


October 22, 2018
Subject | Invesco | Macro views

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) took a decidedly bearish tone during its annual meeting in Bali earlier this month – in fact, I would say it was the grimmest gathering of the IMF that I’ve ever seen. I had the opportunity to attend the talks in Indonesia, and I came home with five key takeaways. Below, I summarize those takeaways and share the viewpoint from Invesco’s Office of the Global Market Strategist.

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Europe: 5 Scenarios for Investors to Watch


October 3, 2018
Subject | Industry views | Institutional | Invesco | Macro views

The future of the euro and that of the EU are inextricably tied according to our latest white paper, I co-authored with Jacek Rostowski, a former Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister of Poland. The big question for us is how could today’s political landscape impact the region in the coming months and years – and what does that mean for investors?

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What does the Italian “no” vote mean for the eurozone?

Italians voted Sunday, Dec. 4, to reject changes to their constitution, leading to the resignation of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and marking a victory for the country’s populist movement. Polls had suggested that Italian voters would reject the referendum on constitutional amendments to reform the Senate by a margin of about 10%. The turnout at 70% and margin of victory at 18% were both higher than expected.

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