Invesco Canada blog

Insights, commentary and investing expertise

Five things to watch in September


Global Market Strategist, Invesco Ltd.
September 3, 2019

Subject | Macro views

August is supposed to be a slow, relaxing month – but this August was anything but that for investors. Trade frictions were on the rise for much of the month. The U.S. Treasury yield curve inverted several times, causing jitters for investors concerned that a U.S. recession is imminent. Of course, stock volatility rose, with the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) hitting its highest level of 2019 in the month of August.1 Instead of enjoying calm, sunny days, markets were rocked last month by interviews with Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) members at Jackson Hole, tweets from President Donald Trump, and geopolitical events in the U.K., Italy and India – to name just a few.

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It’s time to trade in uncertainty for stability


Global Market Strategist, North America
August 29, 2019

Subject | Macro views

As we embarked on this year, I expected 2019 to be the year of slower growth but better policy. And that, I posited, would be better for financial markets than 2018’s combination of strong growth and bad policy, specifically Federal Reserve (Fed) interest rate hikes and trade tariffs.

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Uncertainty hits a high point as the trade war escalates


Global Market Strategist, Invesco Ltd.
August 26, 2019

Subject | Macro views

Last week was one of those weeks when anyone following the news flow closely would have a serious case of whiplash. Friday alone put me in a neck brace as we saw a serious escalation in the trade wars between the U.S. and China. Other notable events last week included:

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Beyond the yield curve: Other economic indicators to watch


Global Market Strategist, Invesco Ltd.
August 20, 2019

Subject | Macro views

Last week, the U.S. Treasury yield curve, specifically the spread between the 10-year U.S. Treasury rate and the 2-year U.S. Treasury rate, briefly inverted. An inverted yield curve is considered to be a good predictor of recession, and so markets sold off on fears that a recession will occur in the next year. However, I believe a U.S. recession is not a foregone conclusion — and so we should monitor the economic data closely. I have received a number of questions from clients and the media about what other indicators to follow to help divine how the economy is doing. The following are just a few indicators to watch — and some caveats:

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Will the inverted yield curve lead to recession?


Global Market Strategist, Invesco Ltd.
August 14, 2019

Subject | Macro views

The U.S. Treasury yield curve, specifically the spread between the 10-year U.S. Treasury rate and the 2-year U.S. Treasury rate, briefly inverted on the morning of Aug. 14. As of early afternoon, the spread was roughly 1 to 2 basis points wide. The brief inversion follows the inversions earlier this year between the spread of short-term rates (such as the federal funds rate and the 3-month Treasury bill) and the benchmark 10-year rate.

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Argentina’s presidential primary raises policy questions


August 14, 2019

Subject | Macro views

Argentina’s presidential primary elections shocked investors Sunday when President Mauricio Macri suffered a major defeat against leftist politician Alberto Fernandez, whose running mate is controversial former president Cristina Kirchner. According to the official election results, Macri received 32% support while Fernandez received 48%, a much wider margin than expected. Election authorities reported high voter turnout at 75%, and Fernandez won every province except Cordoba and the City of Buenos Aires.

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